The Honey Pot

samanthorium:

alethiosaur:

Inspired by Worthington Libraries: Blind Date with a Book!

We started with ~40 books. Two hours later, all but four had found homes with library patrons (sorry, Flush, Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, Persepolis, and The Things They Carried, they don’t know what they’re missing).

Now, to send forth a new fleet of exciting books into student arms. Whew!

I wish somebody would do this here. 

(via densityofstates)

texnessa:

whiferdill:

sarahreesbrennan:

zolabooks:

Storybook gown constructed entirely out of recycled and discarded children’s Golden Books. Designer Ryan Novelline created the bodice from the golden spines of these classic children’s books and sewed together the skirt from their illustrated pages.

Must put book gown… in book…

OMG If I ever get married I want to get married in that dress. And then just wear it forever

This is all kinds of awesome.  I want to ride into a party on the back of a white horse in this dress waving a bottle of champagne over my head.

blogging outfit!

texnessa:

whiferdill:

sarahreesbrennan:

zolabooks:

Storybook gown constructed entirely out of recycled and discarded children’s Golden Books. Designer Ryan Novelline created the bodice from the golden spines of these classic children’s books and sewed together the skirt from their illustrated pages.

Must put book gown… in book…

OMG If I ever get married I want to get married in that dress. And then just wear it forever

This is all kinds of awesome.  I want to ride into a party on the back of a white horse in this dress waving a bottle of champagne over my head.

blogging outfit!

Not THE favorite but A favorite book
your answers and mine:
I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
I wanted to pick a book that I had a copy of, that I had read in the past three years and that I hadn’t mentioned before.
If I think about the story it seems a bit stuffy, silly and frivolous. But I seemingly found it and it found me at exactly the right time. When I was reading it the journal entries often matched up to the same day that I was reading it. I immediately identified with Cassandra the young woman that would sit on chicken coops to write poetry and document her family’s story. My family was driving me crazy at the time, I identified with the dysfunction and the supposed genius that couldn’t take care of itself and the poverty. Parts of it felt like a window into how it might have been for my mother’s side of the family growing up, right down to how much they love ham. And it takes place in a goddamn CASTLE and it’s sweet and funny.
about baths:


Noble deeds and hot baths are the best cures for depression.
I bask first, wash second and then read as long as the hot water holds out. The last stage of a bath, when the water is cooling and there is nothing to look forward to, can be pretty disillusioning. I expect alcohol works much the same way.


they are so hungry:


I shouldn’t think even millionaires could eat anything nicer than new bread and real butter and honey for tea.
"Cocoa, cocoa!"- it might have been the most magnificent drink in the world; which, personally I think it is.
Ham with mustard is a meal of glory.



I am a sucker for literary mustache/beard discrimination:



Simon Cotton’s black beard looks queerer than ever by daylight, especially now I have realized he isn’t at all old - I should guess him to be under thirty. He has nice teeth and rather a nice mouth with a lot of shape to it. It has a peculiar naked look in the the midst of all that hair. How can a young man like to wear a beard? I wonder if he has a scar?
and
"No bathroom on earth will make up for marrying a bearded man you hate."


if I remember correctly the older sister makes him shave before she will kiss him.
SILLY LITTLE GIRLS

Not THE favorite but A favorite book

your answers and mine:

I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith

I wanted to pick a book that I had a copy of, that I had read in the past three years and that I hadn’t mentioned before.

If I think about the story it seems a bit stuffy, silly and frivolous. But I seemingly found it and it found me at exactly the right time. When I was reading it the journal entries often matched up to the same day that I was reading it. I immediately identified with Cassandra the young woman that would sit on chicken coops to write poetry and document her family’s story. My family was driving me crazy at the time, I identified with the dysfunction and the supposed genius that couldn’t take care of itself and the poverty. Parts of it felt like a window into how it might have been for my mother’s side of the family growing up, right down to how much they love ham. And it takes place in a goddamn CASTLE and it’s sweet and funny.

about baths:

Noble deeds and hot baths are the best cures for depression.

I bask first, wash second and then read as long as the hot water holds out. The last stage of a bath, when the water is cooling and there is nothing to look forward to, can be pretty disillusioning. I expect alcohol works much the same way.

they are so hungry:

I shouldn’t think even millionaires could eat anything nicer than new bread and real butter and honey for tea.

"Cocoa, cocoa!"- it might have been the most magnificent drink in the world; which, personally I think it is.

Ham with mustard is a meal of glory.

I am a sucker for literary mustache/beard discrimination:

Simon Cotton’s black beard looks queerer than ever by daylight, especially now I have realized he isn’t at all old - I should guess him to be under thirty. He has nice teeth and rather a nice mouth with a lot of shape to it. It has a peculiar naked look in the the midst of all that hair. How can a young man like to wear a beard? I wonder if he has a scar?

and

"No bathroom on earth will make up for marrying a bearded man you hate."

if I remember correctly the older sister makes him shave before she will kiss him.

SILLY LITTLE GIRLS

imagewomaninterrupted replied to your post: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

The History of Luminous Motion by Scott Bradfield

imagetexnessa answered your question: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

the namesake. beautiful, moving language. a glimpse into another culture. heartfelt.

imagesirpuddleduck answered your question: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

“Taran Wanderer”-v.4 of The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander. Loved it when I was little, and never stopped. I might be Taran.

imageladyofthehouse replied to your post: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

Waterland, by Graham Swift. Because it’s the book I wish I’d written. History as people and people as history. Fens! Beer! Eels! Swimming!

imagemclobstah answered your question: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

I’ve been thinking a lot about Devil in the White City and The Ghost Map recently. Both non-fiction that completely draw me in every time.

imagepenguindownunder answered your question: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

Almost ten years ago, I read “White Oleander” by Janet Fitch and it was like reading poetry. It’s written so beautifully. (1 of my favs)

imageraelee replied to your post: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

There are so many but I’ll pick… A Wrinkle in Time - Because there was a smart girl at the center of it and it was the first time I feel in love with the idea of time travel/traveling between worlds. Not to mention the concept of confronting your fears.

imageblessedarethegeek replied to your post: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

Boy’s Life by Robert McCammon. It’s got so many things I love: theme of growing up and leaving childhood behind, magic, mystery, small Southern towns, memorable characters and “characters,” dinosaurs, rock and roll, murder, and monsters.

imageeebees answered your question: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

To Kill a Mockingbird. It makes me want to stand up for what’s right and also nostalgic somehow.

imagesongbirdstew replied to your post: It doesn’t have to be your absolute favorite but,…

One of my favorites is 14,000 Things To Be Happy About. I collect lists of nice things, and this one is 600 pages long.
This was really wonderful you guys thank you!  some of these are my favorite books also, and the ones I haven’t read, I’ve added to my to-read list for the year.
kateoplis:

“[P]ublic libraries in America … are dynamic, versatile community centers.  They welcomed more than 1.59 billion visitors in 2009 and lent books 2.4 billion times – more than 8 times for each citizen.  More than half of young adults and seniors living in poverty in the United States used public libraries to access the Internet.  They used this access, among other purposes to “find work, apply to college, secure government benefits, and learn about critical medical treatments”. For all this, public libraries cost just $42 per citizen each year to maintain.”
Why Public Libraries Matter … | Forbes [photo]

kateoplis:

“[P]ublic libraries in America … are dynamic, versatile community centers.  They welcomed more than 1.59 billion visitors in 2009 and lent books 2.4 billion times – more than 8 times for each citizen.  More than half of young adults and seniors living in poverty in the United States used public libraries to access the Internet.  They used this access, among other purposes to “find work, apply to college, secure government benefits, and learn about critical medical treatments”. For all this, public libraries cost just $42 per citizen each year to maintain.”

Why Public Libraries Matter … | Forbes [photo]

(via clairesalcedo)

masterpieceofass:

Let’s start 2013 off right. Winner receives:

image

- Fitzwilliam Darcy, Rock Star What is this novel novel you ask? Here’s the summary from the back:

“Fast music, powerful beats, and wild reputations - on and off stage - have made virtuoso guitarist Fitzwilliam Darcy’s band into rock’s newest bad boys. But they’ve lost their latest opening act, and their red-hot summer tour is on the fast track to disaster. Now Darcy and bandmates Charles Bingley and Richard Fitzwilliam are about to meet their match… [girl group headed by Lizzy Bennet, named Long-Borne Suffering].” LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL. It sounds so terrible can I read it with you?

 - 2 Interactive Photoshop Disasters (“Tilney with ice cream” & “Branson with Cupcakes”)

- 1 blank Wintertime at Pemberley card (purchased by yours truly from Lyme Park)

- And last but not least: 1 copy of Flights of Fancy: Writing Inspired by Jane Austen. This is an incredible selection of writings created by my very own JASNA region’s Juvenilia members. It’s hilarious & heartwarming. Jane would be proud.

RULES: Simply reblog this post. On Sunday January 13th I’ll pick a winner at random. 

Goodluck & may the Austen powers be with you. 

jennhoney:

I don’t know if it will make sense but, this picture, to me, is like well tended chaos. Some people have that power, to tend chaos without beating it into submission, it’s a superpower.

jennhoney:

I don’t know if it will make sense but, this picture, to me, is like well tended chaos. Some people have that power, to tend chaos without beating it into submission, it’s a superpower.

hello-zombie:


The Black Rabbit spoke with the voice of water that falls into pools in echoing places in the dark.“El-ahrairah, why have you come here?”“I have come for my people,” whispered El-ahrairah.The Black Rabbit smelled as clean as last year’s bones and in the dark El-ahrairah could see his eyes, for they were red with a light that gave no light.“You are a stranger here, El-ahrairah,” said the Black Rabbit. “You are alive.”—Watership Down

Nate Van Dyke’s contribution to “Inlé”, at Gallery 1988, a group show where over 100 artists interpret the Anti-hero of Richard Adam’s Watership Down.

hello-zombie:

The Black Rabbit spoke with the voice of water that falls into pools in echoing places in the dark.
“El-ahrairah, why have you come here?”
“I have come for my people,” whispered El-ahrairah.
The Black Rabbit smelled as clean as last year’s bones and in the dark El-ahrairah could see his eyes, for they were red with a light that gave no light.
“You are a stranger here, El-ahrairah,” said the Black Rabbit. “You are alive.”
Watership Down

Nate Van Dyke’s contribution to “Inlé”, at Gallery 1988, a group show where over 100 artists interpret the Anti-hero of Richard Adam’s Watership Down.

(via densityofstates)

neil-gaiman:

By Muriel Baker. A handcrafted Good Omens cover.
She said in her message:
I wanted  it to look like an old book and used a pair of unwearable trousers that I bought more than ten years ago in Campden Market London. The embroidery is mostly done by hand but I used the machine for making it up. I decided the motor scooter should be a have a Union Jack because of the Jubilee . You can’t see the motor bikes very well, I’m not the best with a camera. I bought  the Deaths head badge in a trendy Glasgow shop they probably thought it was for a grandchild. The core is a chocolate box.

neil-gaiman:

By Muriel Baker. A handcrafted Good Omens cover.

She said in her message:

I wanted  it to look like an old book and used a pair of unwearable trousers that I bought more than ten years ago in Campden Market London. The embroidery is mostly done by hand but I used the machine for making it up. I decided the motor scooter should be a have a Union Jack because of the Jubilee . You can’t see the motor bikes very well, I’m not the best with a camera. I bought  the Deaths head badge in a trendy Glasgow shop they probably thought it was for a grandchild. The core is a chocolate box.

housingworksbookstore:

blackballoonpublishing:

10 Great Novels and the Cocktails You Should Pair Them With
Moby-Dick
Salty Dog
3 ounces vodka 6 ounces fresh squeezed grapefruit juice salt to rim glass lime wedges
Not only will you feel as though the salt spray is hitting your face with every sip, but you can rest assured that your reading will not be interrupted by bouts of scurvy. And that’s very important for long sea voyages, you know.

I know what I’m doing this weekend.

housingworksbookstore:

blackballoonpublishing:

10 Great Novels and the Cocktails You Should Pair Them With

Moby-Dick

Salty Dog

3 ounces vodka
6 ounces fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
salt to rim glass
lime wedges

Not only will you feel as though the salt spray is hitting your face with every sip, but you can rest assured that your reading will not be interrupted by bouts of scurvy. And that’s very important for long sea voyages, you know.

I know what I’m doing this weekend.

(via sevenplusminustwo)