The Honey Pot

think of how much you would have to scold me

(Source: emissarydeatons, via closeskies)

masterpieceofass:

Let’s start 2013 off right. Winner receives:

image

- Fitzwilliam Darcy, Rock Star What is this novel novel you ask? Here’s the summary from the back:

“Fast music, powerful beats, and wild reputations - on and off stage - have made virtuoso guitarist Fitzwilliam Darcy’s band into rock’s newest bad boys. But they’ve lost their latest opening act, and their red-hot summer tour is on the fast track to disaster. Now Darcy and bandmates Charles Bingley and Richard Fitzwilliam are about to meet their match… [girl group headed by Lizzy Bennet, named Long-Borne Suffering].” LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL. It sounds so terrible can I read it with you?

 - 2 Interactive Photoshop Disasters (“Tilney with ice cream” & “Branson with Cupcakes”)

- 1 blank Wintertime at Pemberley card (purchased by yours truly from Lyme Park)

- And last but not least: 1 copy of Flights of Fancy: Writing Inspired by Jane Austen. This is an incredible selection of writings created by my very own JASNA region’s Juvenilia members. It’s hilarious & heartwarming. Jane would be proud.

RULES: Simply reblog this post. On Sunday January 13th I’ll pick a winner at random. 

Goodluck & may the Austen powers be with you. 


fancying so many errors

fancying so many errors

(Source: violentwavesofemotion, via hildavor)

thelongbournlibrary:

I’m surprised this hasn’t come across my dash since I first read it last week, but it might be of interest to fellow readers here: Stanford researchers tested the difference between casual and close reading by having students read a chapter of Mansfield Park while their brains were being scanned.

Phillips said the global increase in blood flow during close reading suggests that “paying attention to literary texts requires the coordination of multiple complex cognitive functions.” Blood flow also increased during pleasure reading, but in different areas of the brain. Phillips suggested that each style of reading may create distinct patterns in the brain that are “far more complex than just work and play.”

Worth a full read if you’re interested.

(via closeskies)

inkedbyausten:

 “Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse, and the only one who ever told her of them.” - Emma

inkedbyausten:

“Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse, and the only one who ever told her of them.” - Emma

(via closeskies)


“He argued like a young man very much bent on dancing…”
-Jane Austen, Emma

“He argued like a young man very much bent on dancing…”

-Jane Austen, Emma

"What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps one in a continual state of inelegance."
— Jane Austen, Letter (1796-09-18)

(Source: marblefeet, via fuckyeahjaneites)

theotherausten:

#SURPRISE BINGLEY

theotherausten:

#SURPRISE BINGLEY

(Source: toomucheisenberg, via closeskies)

girls of twenty are so desperate to be in love.

(Source: clarenceheartelvis, via fuckyeahjaneites)

theotherausten:

rose-papillon:

That moment when Elinor finds out that Edward is not married and she’s so happy that she freaks the fuck out.

(via runeybadger)