The Honey Pot
jennhoney:

(via Carson Ellis | Portfolio | Sweethearts)

falling into a seldom used tag and finding things I love.

jennhoney:

(via Carson Ellis | Portfolio | Sweethearts)

falling into a seldom used tag and finding things I love.

thereconstructionists:

Few artists have done more to reconstruct the course of contemporary culture than Patti Smith (b. December 30 1946). Celebrated as the “Godmother of Punk,” her musical influence reverberates across acclaimed artists from Garbage to Morrissey to Madonna, and Michael Stipe famously cited her as the core inspiration for founding R.E.M. As a poet and visual artist, she has explored with lyrical poignancy issues of irrepressible urgency, ranging from foreign policy to mortality.
Among Smith’s greatest feats it the systematic demolition of the the perilous and artificial divide between “high” and “low” culture. In 1978, her song “Because the Night” from the groundbreaking album Horses reached #13 on the Billboard 100 chart; in 2010, her remarkable memoir Just Kids earned her the National Book Award. William Blake and Arthur Rimbaud have inspired much of her music, which has moved generations of hearts and bodies across dance floors and mosh pits. In 2005, she was named a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture; in 2006, she brought down the house at CBGB’s with an extraordinary 3½-hour masterpiece of a performance. The following year, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Allen Ginsberg once bought her a sandwich in the East Village after mistaking her for “a very pretty boy.”
In the decades between Horses (1975) and Banga (2012), Smith recorded nine other studio albums, delivered countless poetry readings, and authored a number of books, including the breathtaking The Coral Sea, which chronicles her grief over the loss of her onetime lover, lifelong friend, and comrade-in-artistic-arms Robert Mapplethorpe.
In Just Kids, which documents how Smith found her creative voice during her early life with Mapplethorpe when both were aspiring artists in New York City, she articulates the singular duality of her muse:

It’s the artist’s responsibility to balance mystical communication and the labor of creation.

Learn more: Just Kids | Wikipedia

thereconstructionists:

Few artists have done more to reconstruct the course of contemporary culture than Patti Smith (b. December 30 1946). Celebrated as the “Godmother of Punk,” her musical influence reverberates across acclaimed artists from Garbage to Morrissey to Madonna, and Michael Stipe famously cited her as the core inspiration for founding R.E.M. As a poet and visual artist, she has explored with lyrical poignancy issues of irrepressible urgency, ranging from foreign policy to mortality.

Among Smith’s greatest feats it the systematic demolition of the the perilous and artificial divide between “high” and “low” culture. In 1978, her song “Because the Night” from the groundbreaking album Horses reached #13 on the Billboard 100 chart; in 2010, her remarkable memoir Just Kids earned her the National Book Award. William Blake and Arthur Rimbaud have inspired much of her music, which has moved generations of hearts and bodies across dance floors and mosh pits. In 2005, she was named a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture; in 2006, she brought down the house at CBGB’s with an extraordinary 3½-hour masterpiece of a performance. The following year, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Allen Ginsberg once bought her a sandwich in the East Village after mistaking her for “a very pretty boy.”

In the decades between Horses (1975) and Banga (2012), Smith recorded nine other studio albums, delivered countless poetry readings, and authored a number of books, including the breathtaking The Coral Sea, which chronicles her grief over the loss of her onetime lover, lifelong friend, and comrade-in-artistic-arms Robert Mapplethorpe.

In Just Kids, which documents how Smith found her creative voice during her early life with Mapplethorpe when both were aspiring artists in New York City, she articulates the singular duality of her muse:

It’s the artist’s responsibility to balance mystical communication and the labor of creation.

(Source: kemistrygallery)

gonturan:

umla:

Maybe I’ll Just Marry The Sky by ohmycavalier on Flickr.

Jules.
takatoshisano:

by sanoooo
orano:

Robert CRUMB - from ART & BEAUTY MAGAZINE #2 - 2003 - Fantagraphics Books, Washington U.S.A.

orano:

Robert CRUMB - from ART & BEAUTY MAGAZINE #2 - 2003 - Fantagraphics Books, Washington U.S.A.

(via womaninterrupted)

wnycradiolab:

artandsciencejournal:

Aganetha Dyck

Aganetha Dyck, a Canadian artist from Manitoba, takes ordinary objects and turns them into exotic and humorous art. In the series above, Dyck covered figurines with honeycombs and beework to reveal the intricacies of communication. As Dyck stated in an interview with Mason Studio,

Honeybee communication research continues throughout the scientific and beekeeping world. Scientists and beekeepers, as well as dozens of international artists, plus a growing number of global citizens, are increasingly concerned with the health of honeybees. Communication between species is urgent. Research continues to try and prevent honeybees from disappearing from our world. The reason for the concern of disappearing honeybees is mainly due to the honeybees ability to pollinate over 40% of the world’s food supply.”

Dyck sees herself as a collaborator with the bees and finds herself amazed at their ability to create strong structures out of minimal materials. As she states,

I never cease to wonder at the honeybee’s ability to construct strong, awesome structures using the least amount of material to construct what is required. Architects around the world have studied the strength of honeycomb structures. Both architects and artists have been influenced by the honeybee’s design patterns.”

Her artworks are a combination of message and collaboration. Overall, Dyck uses the work of the bees to remind us of their importance in our daily life. For more information on Dyck’s work click here

-Lee

I don’t know why, exactly, but I find this unspeakably creepy.  Also beautiful.

"unspeakably creepy.  Also beautiful."

This line always works!

orano:

Robert CRUMB - from ART & BEAUTY MAGAZINE #2 - 2003 - Fantagraphics Books, Washington U.S.A.
“…symphony of graceful…”

orano:

Robert CRUMB - from ART & BEAUTY MAGAZINE #2 - 2003 - Fantagraphics Books, Washington U.S.A.

“…symphony of graceful…”

(via womaninterrupted)

Please don’t go
I’ll eat you up
I love you so

Please don’t go

I’ll eat you up

I love you so

(Source: timshel1022, via womaninterrupted)