The Honey Pot

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Forgive”. The stories we received were sweet and sad.  Click on the photos above to read each entry in full.

This week’s prompt is “Rebel”, in honor of the Fourth of July.

Write a story about rebellion. 

This can range from a teenager rebelling against a parent, to a woman in her fifties rebelling against what’s expected of her or an individual rebellion against a dystopian state.

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

(via clairesalcedo)

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Pain”, a wonderfully deep theme for any writer to work with. We received some amazing submissions last week.Click on the stories above for an expanded view of each person’s stories. 

This week’s prompt is “Sacrifice”. What would be the biggest thing for your character to give up? Sacrificing is more than just giving something up, however. It’s giving something up for something else that’s more important.

Set up a story that involves sacrifice. Establish what’s at stake, what’s important to your character, what it costs emotionally and physically to sacrifice something.

This can be as deep as giving one’s life for another, or a hilarious situation where someone feels he/she is a martyr for letting someone else have the last piece of cake. 

As always it’s up to you. Just be creative and enjoy writing!


As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Paradise”, a wonderfully deep theme for any writer to work with. We received some amazing submissions last week.Click on the stories above for an expanded view of each person’s stories. 

This week’s prompt is “Pain”. Nothing prompts a plot or character development like pain:

Write a story that features some kind of pain. Is it physical? Emotional?

How does it drive your character and/or plot? Make sure it does. It’s one thing to write about pain for pain’s sake, but make it count. Write a story that uses pain for some end.


As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

(via clairesalcedo)

doctorwho:

SATURDAAAAYYY!

grandmas and dragons

doctorwho:

SATURDAAAAYYY!

grandmas and dragons

(Source: arthurdarvilltweets)

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Doom”. Click on the stories above for an expanded view of each person’s stories. Even though it was a holiday weekend, we still had plenty of excellent tales of facing inevitable destruction.

This week’s prompt is “Pride”:

How does pride work in favor of or against your character? Is your character brought down, like a Greek hero, by his or her own hubris? Or is he or she, like a Randian monster, propelled by pride to the heights of success and power?

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Illusion”. People wrote wonderful tales of magic, misunderstanding and more last week. Click on the pictures above to see an expanded view of the great stories that people contributed.

This week’s prompt is “Lost”:

Who or what is lost? Is it your main character? Someone important to the main character? An object? An ideal?

What is at stake if a character remains lost? If the object that’s missing can’t be found?

What is at risk if the ideal that is lost can’t be recovered? Can it? How would that happen?

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

(via clairesalcedo)

theewhitetiger:

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Victory”. People wrote from all spectrums of the theme: from the eyes of the winner, from the eyes of the loser, they wrote of acts of liberation and sometimes, dark victories through violence.

Click on the pictures above to see an expanded view of the wonderful stories that people shared last week.

This week’s prompt is “Goodbye”:

The act of leaving or dismissing is one of the hardest things we have to do. Saying goodbye, or being said goodbye to, can rip our hearts out, or free us from something we’ve been chained to. 

Is this goodbye a good thing or a bad thing?

Is your character the one saying it or the one hearing it?


Tell us a story about a goodbye. It can be heartbreaking, exhilarating or hilarious. YOU CHOOSE.

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

Contribution 1 _ Contribution 2

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Our last #FridayFiction was themed “Love”, in honor of Valentine’s Day.

Click on the pictures above to see an expanded view of the stories our amazing community of writers shared with us during our last #FridayFiction. 

This week’s prompt is “Revenge”. 

I’d like to pretend that this prompt came to me while I was listening to the opera, but no, it was actually a Die Hard marathon. 

It has Alan Rickman in it. I’m still classy.

What is your character avenging? Was he/she jilted by a rotten lover? Double-crossed in a heist? Or paying back a parent for a lifetime of neglect and misery? 

Try playing with the element of surprise in the way you reveal who is being punished for past crimes and what those crimes are.

Experiment with POV, different characters, and write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in as short a way as you can.

Also, try and interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

(via theewhitetiger)

sarahsamudre:

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s story prompt was “Dreams”, in honor of the New Year. Click on the pictures above to see an expanded view of the stories our amazing community of writers shared with us last week.

This week’s story prompt is “Mystery”. Honestly, this prompt idea came to my husband and I after a week of watching the two latest Sherlock episodes. Anyone else notice that Moriarty is some amazing kind of cheerful, evil, hipster muppet?

Mystery should be an amazing prompt for us to explore within the short space we have in our tweets. You have to set up the scene, but allow enough room for the turn at the end that will suck us in. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to create a story that is, in itself, complete and yet leaves us messaging you, desperate for more.

Basically, if you make someone angry later today with how great your story was, if you get demands for more, then you’ve done your job. As always, the key to this will be word choice. Find the word that communicates several ideas within that one signifier, and you can build a great piece of flash fiction!

Experiment with POV, different characters, and write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in as short a way as you can.

Also, try and interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

Hope to see you and your flashfiction this afternoon!

As always, it would be wonderful to see some of you join in on this. You don’t have to be a writer. Everyone has a story to share and this is a really fun way to meet great people on Twitter.

monkeyknifefight:



LA people should start a neighborhood watch-ish thing that involves a schedule of carrying Aziz Ansari around. ~Doing the good works~

monkeyknifefight:

LA people should start a neighborhood watch-ish thing that involves a schedule of carrying Aziz Ansari around. ~Doing the good works~

(Source: benwyattplaidotp, via dressesdancingandtv)