The Honey Pot

up until a few hours ago I thought temptuous was a word

and no I’m not trying to say tempestuous.

(Source: millionfish, via invaderxan)

dobearsshalalala:

lucithor:

WHY WAS I UNAWARE OF THE FACT THAT “DISGRUNTLED” IS, IN FACT, THE OPPOSITE OF “GRUNTLED”

image

WHY DOES NOBODY USE THIS WORD

NEW FAVOURITE WORD.

(via eebees)

ambr0secadwell:

thegardenofecru:

iamthebatfan:

carlboygenius:

Slang: Victorian English

Source: http://www.buzzfeed.com/lukelewis/surprising-victorian-slang-terms

Crinkum-crankum.

TALLYWAGS

I get the feeling the Victorians would have been fans of “frickle-frackle”

(via sirpuddleduck)

Words to keep inside your pocket:

  • Quiescent - a quiet, soft-spoken soul.
  • Chimerical - merely imaginary; fanciful. 
  • Susurrus - a whispering or rustling sound. 
  • Raconteur - one who excels in story-telling. 
  • Clinquant - glittering; tinsel-like. 
  • Aubade - a song greeting the dawn. 
  • Ephemeral - lasting a very short time. 
  • Sempiternal - everlasting; eternal. 
  • Euphonious - pleasing; sweet in sound. 
  • Billet-doux - a love letter. 
  • Redamancy - act of loving in return.

(via invaderxan)

"

The English “please” is short for “if you please,” “if it pleases you to do this” — it is the same in most European languages (French si il vous plait, Spanish por favor). Its literal meaning is “you are under no obligation to do this.” “Hand me the salt. Not that I am saying that you have to!” This is not true; there is a social obligation, and it would be almost impossible not to comply. But etiquette largely consists of the exchange of polite fictions (to use less polite language, lies). When you ask someone to pass the salt, you are also giving them an order; by attaching the word “please,” you are saying that it is not an order. But, in fact, it is.

In English, “thank you” derives from “think,” it originally meant, “I will remember what you did for me” — which is usually not true either — but in other languages (the Portuguese obrigado is a good example) the standard term follows the form of the English “much obliged” — it actually does mean “I am in your debt.” The French merci is even more graphic: it derives from “mercy,” as in begging for mercy; by saying it you are symbolically placing yourself in your benefactor’s power — since a debtor is, after all, a criminal. Saying “you’re welcome,” or “it’s nothing” (French de rien, Spanish de nada) — the latter has at least the advantage of often being literally true — is a way of reassuring the one to whom one has passed the salt that you are not actually inscribing a debit in your imaginary moral account book. So is saying “my pleasure” — you are saying, “No, actually, it’s a credit, not a debit — you did me a favor because in asking me to pass the salt, you gave me the opportunity to do something I found rewarding in itself!

"

David Graeber in Debt: The First 5,000 Years (via fivepips)

Customs encode a lot of social values.

(via theprophetlilith)

while the etymology of “thank” is technically correct, the last stage of the word that meant “thought” was ca. proto-Germanic *þankaz "thought, thanks", the noun from which the verb *þankōną “thank” was derived. from an Indo-European perspective, the connection between Old English þancian “thank” and þencan “think” is pretty clear, but it’s not necessarily certain that speakers of the language would have perceived it that way.

anyway, the dangers of overanalyzing in historical linguistics aside, these are accurate and interesting.

(via fralusans-ana-marein)

(Source: mongoosenamedt, via closeskies)

imagesongbirdstew replied to your photo

Afternoon hindguts blog.
Tags: wordz

queennubian:

Jettatura sounds like a practice of a dark art….Mom’s of color are boss level Jettaura throwers

(Source: iraffiruse, via sidramatic)

(Source: cfergusons, via houseofasheroo)