The Honey Pot
deadhorsebrooklyn:

Do it. Submit!

here you go my tumblroo baby writers!

deadhorsebrooklyn:

Do it. Submit!

here you go my tumblroo baby writers!

(via sarahsamudre)

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House . Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction prompt was “Growth.” Click on the photos above to read the stories.

This week’s prompt is “Fright,” in honor of the impending Halloween holiday. 

Write a story about ghouls, monsters, things that go bump in the night…

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Announcement: Twitter has announced a #TwitterFiction Festival. Browse through the posts here on this blog and find the stories you’ve submitted! Submissions are now open and if you feel particularly inspired by the #FridayFiction you’ve posted over the last year, you can submit it to their blog. 

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

(via clairesalcedo)

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction prompt was “The End.” Click on the photos above to read the stories.

This week’s prompt is “Growth. How do characters change and progress in who they are? What challenges, external or internal do they have to overcome in order to grow?

Write a story about growth, or the lack thereof. Why does your character need to grow? What happens if your character doesn’t grow?

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Announcement: Twitter has announced a #TwitterFiction Festival. Browse through the posts here on this blog and find the stories you’ve submitted! Submissions are now open and if you feel particularly inspired by the #FridayFiction you’ve posted over the last year, you can submit it to their blog. 

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

neil-gaiman:


Near the end of May I had the privilege of giving a tour of the Penn Museum Mesopotamian storage to Neil Gaiman, author of American Gods, Anansi Boys,Coraline, and many other excellent books, graphic novels, and stories of all sorts. I asked him what he would like to see and he said anything and everything, so I took him through the shelves and stopped first at an artifact I thought he might have a particular interest in. Known as the disk of Enheduanna, it holds a connection to Neil’s profession — it depicts a person who is probably the world’s first recorded author, Enheduanna, daughter of Sargon of Akkad and high priestess of the moon god at Ur.

(It was wonderful! Read more about Enheduanna & what we know of her at http://penn.museum/blog/museum/ur-digitization-project-item-of-the-month-june-2012/)

neil-gaiman:

Near the end of May I had the privilege of giving a tour of the Penn Museum Mesopotamian storage to Neil Gaiman, author of American GodsAnansi Boys,Coraline, and many other excellent books, graphic novels, and stories of all sorts. I asked him what he would like to see and he said anything and everything, so I took him through the shelves and stopped first at an artifact I thought he might have a particular interest in. Known as the disk of Enheduanna, it holds a connection to Neil’s profession — it depicts a person who is probably the world’s first recorded author, Enheduanna, daughter of Sargon of Akkad and high priestess of the moon god at Ur.

(It was wonderful! Read more about Enheduanna & what we know of her at http://penn.museum/blog/museum/ur-digitization-project-item-of-the-month-june-2012/)

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Pride”. Click on the stories above for an expanded view of each person’s stories. We had some amazing stories last week ranging from the good side of pride, to the ugly side, to shame and inability to humble oneself when it counts. 

This week’s prompt is “Bully”, in honor of our Program Director, Brian McGuigan, who did a sneak peek last night of the show he’s developing. “F#t Fuck” focuses on a myriad of stuff from Brian’s life but really delves into his personal history of being bullied. 

Come up with a story about bullies.

Is your character dishing it out or taking it?

Is this battle being staged on the playground or is it acted out in the office breakroom?

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

(via clairesalcedo)

fwarg:

raptorific:

I have too much time on my hands. 

my life is complete.

(via theewhitetiger)

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was “Doom”. Click on the stories above for an expanded view of each person’s stories. Even though it was a holiday weekend, we still had plenty of excellent tales of facing inevitable destruction.

This week’s prompt is “Pride”:

How does pride work in favor of or against your character? Is your character brought down, like a Greek hero, by his or her own hubris? Or is he or she, like a Randian monster, propelled by pride to the heights of success and power?

As you write, try and experiment with POV, different characters, and feel free to write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in the tiny space that you have.

Also, interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

If you’ve been reading for a long time, please continue to enjoy our great stories, but also, feel free to offer up your own! You wouldn’t think, as vast a social network as Twitter is, that it’d be a safe space to offer up your fiction, but it is, and it’s a wonderful way to network with other creatives online.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction this afternoon!

supernovasidra:

In 1933, renowned author F. Scott Fitzgerald ended a letter to his 11-year-old daughter, Scottie, with a list of things to worry about, not worry about, and simply think about. It read as follows.

Things to worry about:


Worry about courageWorry about cleanlinessWorry about efficiencyWorry about horsemanshipThings not to worry about: Don’t worry about popular opinionDon’t worry about dollsDon’t worry about the pastDon’t worry about the futureDon’t worry about growing upDon’t worry about anybody getting ahead of youDon’t worry about triumphDon’t worry about failure unless it comes through your own faultDon’t worry about mosquitoesDon’t worry about fliesDon’t worry about insects in generalDon’t worry about parentsDon’t worry about boysDon’t worry about disappointmentsDon’t worry about pleasuresDon’t worry about satisfactionsThings to think about: What am I really aiming at? How good am I really in comparison to my contemporaries in regard to:(a) Scholarship(b) Do I really understand about people and am I able to get along with them? (c) Am I trying to make my body a useful instrument or am I neglecting it? With dearest love,Daddy

(Source: F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Life in Letters; Image: F. Scott Fitzgerald with his daughter, Scottie, in 1924.)
I have a crush on a dead writer. Who doesn’t? Also, I love lists. Who doesn’t?

supernovasidra:

In 1933, renowned author F. Scott Fitzgerald ended a letter to his 11-year-old daughter, Scottie, with a list of things to worry about, not worry about, and simply think about. It read as follows.

Things to worry about:

Worry about courage
Worry about cleanliness
Worry about efficiency
Worry about horsemanship

Things not to worry about: 
Don’t worry about popular opinion
Don’t worry about dolls
Don’t worry about the past
Don’t worry about the future
Don’t worry about growing up
Don’t worry about anybody getting ahead of you
Don’t worry about triumph
Don’t worry about failure unless it comes through your own fault
Don’t worry about mosquitoes
Don’t worry about flies
Don’t worry about insects in general
Don’t worry about parents
Don’t worry about boys
Don’t worry about disappointments
Don’t worry about pleasures
Don’t worry about satisfactions

Things to think about: 
What am I really aiming at? 
How good am I really in comparison to my contemporaries in regard to:
(a) Scholarship
(b) Do I really understand about people and am I able to get along with them? 
(c) Am I trying to make my body a useful instrument or am I neglecting it? 

With dearest love,

Daddy
(Source: F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Life in Letters; Image: F. Scott Fitzgerald with his daughter, Scottie, in 1924.)
I have a crush on a dead writer. Who doesn’t? Also, I love lists. Who doesn’t?

(via sidramatic)

friday-fiction:

Today is #FridayFiction!

#FridayFiction is a flash fiction workshop that runs every week on Twitter from 3 - 6 p.m. PST, facilitated by Richard Hugo House. Each week, we pick a theme and create a story based off of that theme. We share it with the community of #fridayfiction writers by using the tag in our tweets. You can contribute more than one story. You can use the same character in every story, or multiple characters. The important thing is that your story, with the tag #FridayFiction, not exceed the 140 character limit that Twitter sets.

Why do we do this?

Flash fiction gives us a chance to re-examine our language in a way that we normally wouldn’t be able to do. The confines of the tweet force us to think of different ways of saying something, finding the word that communicates the biggest idea in the shortest way, and using Twitter allows us to find other writers on social media.

For more on why we write flash fiction and use Twitter to do it, read “Exercises in Brevity” on our website.

Last week’s #FridayFiction was themed “Grief”.

Click on the pictures above to see an expanded view of the stories our amazing community of writers shared with us during our last #FridayFiction. Some of the stories brought tears to my eyes!

This week’s prompt is “Adventure”.

Write about a character embarking on or in the middle of a great adventure.

Is he or she in danger?

Is your character wide-eyed and optimistic about the prospect of the adventure or reluctant in a “I’m too old for this sh*t” vein?

Where’s the danger coming from? How quickly can you resolve it in the space of a single tweet?

Experiment with POV, different characters, and write more than one story! Writing within the confines of a tweet is difficult, but it gets you into an incredible mindset. Find the right words to create the mood, the plot and convey character in as short a way as you can.

Also, try and interact with the community! Every week, a lot of amazing writers gather together and share their stories. These people don’t just offer up great stories, they are great people to follow throughout the rest of the week as well. Being on Twitter is all about curating the conversation you want to be apart of and this is a great way to meet people who love being creative.

Hope to see you and your flash fiction on Friday afternoon!

(via clairesalcedo)

"Emotions, in my experience, aren’t covered by single words. I don’t believe in “sadness,” “joy,” or “regret.” Maybe the best proof that the language is patriarchal is that it oversimplifies feeling. I’d like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic train-car constructions like, say, “the happiness that attends disaster.” Or: “the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy.” I’d like to show how “intimations of mortality brought on by aging family members” connects with “the hatred of mirrors that begins in middle age.” I’d like to have a word for “the sadness inspired by failing restaurants” as well as for “the excitement of getting a room with a minibar.” I’ve never had the right words to describe my life, and now that I’ve entered my story, I need them more than ever."
— Jeffrey Eugenides (via writeyourheart-out)

(Source: atomos, via cassismycopilot)